Queenstown Golf Course

Queenstown Golf Course Background Image

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General Comment/Aesthetics:

At the end of the Kelvin peninsula lies a headland that would, almost without doubt, be the most valuable real estate in the entire basin.  All day sun, almost entirely surrounded by water (and as a consequence benefiting from the thermal influences such a large body of water provides) with stunning views in all directions – what better spot for residential development?  Except instead there lies a golf course!.

Along with Arrowtown, the QGC is one of the original members’ courses.  A perfect foil for the more palatial resort offerings nearby, the course is rather more humble in both design and facilities than its illustrious neighbours but still offers a very pleasant day out.

Fairly steep and rocky, the course is not an easy walk so if you aren’t looking for a cardio work out you might be better with a cart.

Design/Architecture:

The course has gone through various iterations and upgrades during its time but the general routing substantially remains.  The holes tend to play up and down the major slopes so judging elevation change becomes a significant challenge.
Fairway conditions are somewhat variable but the greens usually putt fast and true.

Favourite Holes:

The par four 5th hole glides right to left around the shores of Lake Wakatipu and, prior to the arrival of the likes of Kauri Cliffs, Cape Kidnappers and Jacks Point may have been the most photographed hole in NZ golf.  With good reason – a tee shot that demands courage!

Facilities:

Although a members course the club has most if not all of the facilities you would expect at more tourist oriented courses.  Food is generally available, the pro shop is well stocked and there are a good number of carts available.
Accessibility and Cost:

Conclusion:

When analysing a course such as this it is hard to know how to spate the surroundings from the shot values themselves.  If your emphasis is on design and strategy then the course falls a little short.  If, however, the surroundings are as important as the golf itself then you are unlikely to be disappointed.

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Greg Turner

​Greg Turner needs no introduction from his origins as an elite amateur in New Zealand, competing in the Eisenhower Trophy in 1982 and 1984, Greg became a professional and spent 18 years on the world’s golf stage, winning 12 events internationally (including 4 in Europe, 3 in Australia, 2 NZ Opens and a NZPGA). He represented NZ on numerous occasions at World and Dunhill Cups, Australasia in the inaugural Alfred Dunhill Challenge and was a member of the victorious International Team in the 1998 Presidents Cup.

Greg is a tireless supporter of the game of golf. With this hat on he has had many roles - from establishing a development tour in New Zealand (GTNZ, which went on to become the Charles Tour), he has published numerous articles in many publications, and is very committed to a strategy for promoting New Zealand as a superior Golf Destination for international travellers; a goal that requires both upgrading of many existing facilities to meet the required standard, and widespread international promotion.

Aside from his achievements on the golf course however, Greg has been instrumental to golf in New Zealand through setting up a golf course design and corporate design business and is now working on the New Zealand Tourism, golf strategy board for Tourism New Zealand.


The Author
Greg Turner

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